Bennachie from air

Bennachie from air

Rich in legend and biodiversity, historically immortalised in verse, Bennachie is a range of hills 20 miles north-west of Aberdeen near Inverurie, rising above the surrounding countryside and visible from all over Aberdeenshire and beyond. Three principal tops form the eastern half of the range - Mither Tap with its remains of an old fort, Craig Shannoch and Oxen Craig, the highest summit at 1733'.

The battle of Harlaw on July 24th 1411 is the bloodiest and most famous event that has ever taken place under the shadow of Bennachie, with its contending forces and great issues at stake. Donald, Lord of the Isles, commanded a fierce horde of Island forces, 10,000 in number. Donald was threatening to burn and plunder Aberdeen. King James I of Scotland was in captivity. To save the city, the Earl of Mar was commissioned by the Regent of Scotland to head a Royalist crack force led by the knighthood and nobility of the East coast.Very few North-Easterners were named as articipants.

The battle at Harlaw lasted a single day. Over 1500 Royalist warriors and Island clansmen were slaughtered. An Aberdeenshire ballad describes the River Urie as 'running red with blood from the dead and wounded'.

The Islanders retreated, unpursued. Both sides thought they had lost - and the descendants of both sides claimed that they had won.

The battlefield site is now marked by a 12M high memorial. A scale model of the battle of Harlaw will be handed over to Garioch Heritage Society when their new museum in Inverurie opens.


Bailies project: January 2017

www.inverurieherald.co.uk/news/business/could-bennachie-be-the-most-loved-hill-in-britain-1-3232179

Discovering Britain - Bennachie

One of 14 projects funded as part of The Year of Natural Scotland 2013 was Natural Bennachie, which saw artists collaborating with partners and the local community to explore the natural heritage and history of the landmark. Natural Bennachie is led by the Scottish Sculpture Workshop at Lumsden. The project culminated in an eco-friendly public celebration, site-specific artworks and art-science collaborations. There are outdoor workshops, exhibitions at Aberdeen University, and sculptural work on the hill.

Archaeologist Colin Shepherd has coordinated a Landscapes project involving the University and hill guardians, the Bailies of Bennachie, which was founded as a voluntary conservation society in 1973. Colin said:- "Natural Bennachie will contribute important information and enhance our understanding of the environmental changes since the last Ice Age." Anybody wishing to become practically involved can email: bennachielandscapes@scottish-heritage.org.uk.

See previous image for a story on the Bennachie Colonists.

Walkhighlands


The Romans invaded Britain in 43AD. Forty years later they marched on ancient Caledonian granaries which had just been filled after the harvest, then fought a pitched battle with late Iron-age Picts at Mons Graupius, the Graupian Mountains in Scotland. The battle site is not known although the slopes of Bennachie are one possibility. Knolls near the Raedykes Roman camp, Kempstone and Megray Hills in Kincardineshire, the Gask Ridge in Perthshire, Elsick and Grampian Mounths, and regions round the River Dee have been other loci in quo mooted.

For the Caledonians it was a grim choice - confront a superior force or starvation. The Roman historian Tacitus recorded 10,000 Caledonians slain, under the leadership of 'The Swordsman' Calgacus, compared to 360 Roman casualties.

In 1476 a typesetter's mistake was made in a printed edition of Tacitus's biography of his father-in-law, the Roman Governor Agricola, whereby the name Graupians was misspelt as Grampians. The region has kept the 'Grampian' spelling ever since.

A theatre performance detailing the story of Mons Graupius is being developed in North-East Scotland. Independent storyteller artist Andy Cannon is creating a new production called ’The Last People on Earth’. He is visiting the possible sites of the battle, talking to archaeologists, academics and artists.

Andy Cannon has been writing, performing and directing performances especially for children and their families for over 25 years. Last year, as part of the 2014 Scottish International Storytelling Festival, Andy presented 'Tales of a Grandson', the story of Scotland's past through the eyes of a 10 year old boy on a odyssey with his grandfather back in the summer of 1973. Together they travelled in an Hillman Imp to many locations in both time and space in our Nation's past.

The Lemon Tree in Aberdeen will be working with Andy and making connections in North-East Scotland to help develop 'The Last People On Earth'. The collaboration will bring together storytelling, original music and archeaological discoveries to unearth a fragment of truth about the first recorded battle in Scotland's colourful past, a day nearly 2000 years ago that shaped our Nation.

Time Commanders - Battle of Mons Graupius (YouTube)
Battle of Harlaw 1411
Bennachie Colonists
Aberdeen Performing Arts/Andy Cannon/Artist Exchange

Update 28th February 2016
Save Bennachie Alliance is working to protect and defend Bennachie and its surrounding area from the A96 dual carriageway

Save Bennachie blog
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Date:
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Bennachie from air

Bennachie from air

Rich in legend and biodiversity, historically immortalised in verse, Bennachie is a range of hills 20 miles north-west of Aberdeen near Inverurie, rising above the surrounding countryside and visible from all over Aberdeenshire and beyond. Three principal tops form the eastern half of the range - Mither Tap with its remains of an old fort, Craig Shannoch and Oxen Craig, the highest summit at 1733'.

The battle of Harlaw on July 24th 1411 is the bloodiest and most famous event that has ever taken place under the shadow of Bennachie, with its contending forces and great issues at stake. Donald, Lord of the Isles, commanded a fierce horde of Island forces, 10,000 in number. Donald was threatening to burn and plunder Aberdeen. King James I of Scotland was in captivity. To save the city, the Earl of Mar was commissioned by the Regent of Scotland to head a Royalist crack force led by the knighthood and nobility of the East coast.Very few North-Easterners were named as articipants.

The battle at Harlaw lasted a single day. Over 1500 Royalist warriors and Island clansmen were slaughtered. An Aberdeenshire ballad describes the River Urie as 'running red with blood from the dead and wounded'.

The Islanders retreated, unpursued. Both sides thought they had lost - and the descendants of both sides claimed that they had won.

The battlefield site is now marked by a 12M high memorial. A scale model of the battle of Harlaw will be handed over to Garioch Heritage Society when their new museum in Inverurie opens.


Bailies project: January 2017

www.inverurieherald.co.uk/news/business/could-bennachie-be-the-most-loved-hill-in-britain-1-3232179

Discovering Britain - Bennachie

One of 14 projects funded as part of The Year of Natural Scotland 2013 was Natural Bennachie, which saw artists collaborating with partners and the local community to explore the natural heritage and history of the landmark. Natural Bennachie is led by the Scottish Sculpture Workshop at Lumsden. The project culminated in an eco-friendly public celebration, site-specific artworks and art-science collaborations. There are outdoor workshops, exhibitions at Aberdeen University, and sculptural work on the hill.

Archaeologist Colin Shepherd has coordinated a Landscapes project involving the University and hill guardians, the Bailies of Bennachie, which was founded as a voluntary conservation society in 1973. Colin said:- "Natural Bennachie will contribute important information and enhance our understanding of the environmental changes since the last Ice Age." Anybody wishing to become practically involved can email: bennachielandscapes@scottish-heritage.org.uk.

See previous image for a story on the Bennachie Colonists.

Walkhighlands


The Romans invaded Britain in 43AD. Forty years later they marched on ancient Caledonian granaries which had just been filled after the harvest, then fought a pitched battle with late Iron-age Picts at Mons Graupius, the Graupian Mountains in Scotland. The battle site is not known although the slopes of Bennachie are one possibility. Knolls near the Raedykes Roman camp, Kempstone and Megray Hills in Kincardineshire, the Gask Ridge in Perthshire, Elsick and Grampian Mounths, and regions round the River Dee have been other loci in quo mooted.

For the Caledonians it was a grim choice - confront a superior force or starvation. The Roman historian Tacitus recorded 10,000 Caledonians slain, under the leadership of 'The Swordsman' Calgacus, compared to 360 Roman casualties.

In 1476 a typesetter's mistake was made in a printed edition of Tacitus's biography of his father-in-law, the Roman Governor Agricola, whereby the name Graupians was misspelt as Grampians. The region has kept the 'Grampian' spelling ever since.

A theatre performance detailing the story of Mons Graupius is being developed in North-East Scotland. Independent storyteller artist Andy Cannon is creating a new production called ’The Last People on Earth’. He is visiting the possible sites of the battle, talking to archaeologists, academics and artists.

Andy Cannon has been writing, performing and directing performances especially for children and their families for over 25 years. Last year, as part of the 2014 Scottish International Storytelling Festival, Andy presented 'Tales of a Grandson', the story of Scotland's past through the eyes of a 10 year old boy on a odyssey with his grandfather back in the summer of 1973. Together they travelled in an Hillman Imp to many locations in both time and space in our Nation's past.

The Lemon Tree in Aberdeen will be working with Andy and making connections in North-East Scotland to help develop 'The Last People On Earth'. The collaboration will bring together storytelling, original music and archeaological discoveries to unearth a fragment of truth about the first recorded battle in Scotland's colourful past, a day nearly 2000 years ago that shaped our Nation.

Time Commanders - Battle of Mons Graupius (YouTube)
Battle of Harlaw 1411
Bennachie Colonists
Aberdeen Performing Arts/Andy Cannon/Artist Exchange

Update 28th February 2016
Save Bennachie Alliance is working to protect and defend Bennachie and its surrounding area from the A96 dual carriageway

Save Bennachie blog
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: