Peterhead Power Station - a carbon capture future?

Peterhead Power Station - a carbon capture future?

As a vital cog in our energy mix, CCS will be neither operational nor cost-competitive until the 2020s. To secure long-term low carbon operation and avoid a looming capacity crunch, CCS delivery must be accelerated.

Carbon Sequestration and Storage (CSS) can capture 90% of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by using fossil fuels in electricity generation. Addressing the global challenge of climate change takes many forms. A low carbon future is a must. World energy demands are projected to grow by 40% over the next 20 years, so fossil fuels will still be required. Captured CO2 can be transported offshore to be permanently stored in saline aquifers and depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs, possibly enhancing oil recovery. CSS could also be used in chemical processing, and cement and steel manufacture. Whilst always remembering that our greatest resource is our people, Scotland could capitalise on geographic advantages and industrial assets to become a leader in the demonstration and deployment of CSS technology. There are also plans to expand the Power Station and build a subsea energy link between Peterhead and England via a two-gigawatt cable. This Eastern Link would enhance Peterhead's position as a hub for energy businesses, particularly from the renewables sector.

Test drilling in England has found a site that could store 200 million tonnes of CO2 undersea from a cluster of Humberside industries.

The prospect of collecting emissions from an industrial hub and storing them deep below the North Sea has edged closer after initial test drilling off the Yorkshire coast was declared a success. National Grid said that its exploration project revealed an undersea site 65K offshore that could hold around 200 million tonnes of CO2 - equivalent to taking 10 million cars off the roads for a decade.

This type of storage site is common across Europe, potentially providing crucial capacity that would enable CCS technology, without which, according to some estimates, the cost of tackling climate change is expected to be around 70% greater. National Grid described the successful drilling as "a major milestone" towards its plan to create a CCS hub in the industrialised Humber region, which accounts for around 10 per cent of total UK emissions.

Carbon capture, fracking and green-tinged Tories. Guardian letter, February 4th

TUC General Secretary Frances O'Grady reported in February 2014:- 'CCS is a great opportunity to reinvigorate our manufacturing sector and bring new research and development design and construction jobs to Yorkshire and North-East Scotland. Our depleted gas and oilfields make the UK one of the best areas in the world to exploit CCS technology.'

In March 2015 Tower Bridge Ventures proposed to dock three floating gas-fired power stations in Scottish ports on specialised barges. SSE/Scottish Hydro also wants the contract for PPS.

News post from Offshore Aberdeen
Ref:
Date:
2012-07-27 00:00:00.0
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Peterhead Power Station - a carbon capture future?

Peterhead Power Station - a carbon capture future?

As a vital cog in our energy mix, CCS will be neither operational nor cost-competitive until the 2020s. To secure long-term low carbon operation and avoid a looming capacity crunch, CCS delivery must be accelerated.

Carbon Sequestration and Storage (CSS) can capture 90% of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by using fossil fuels in electricity generation. Addressing the global challenge of climate change takes many forms. A low carbon future is a must. World energy demands are projected to grow by 40% over the next 20 years, so fossil fuels will still be required. Captured CO2 can be transported offshore to be permanently stored in saline aquifers and depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs, possibly enhancing oil recovery. CSS could also be used in chemical processing, and cement and steel manufacture. Whilst always remembering that our greatest resource is our people, Scotland could capitalise on geographic advantages and industrial assets to become a leader in the demonstration and deployment of CSS technology. There are also plans to expand the Power Station and build a subsea energy link between Peterhead and England via a two-gigawatt cable. This Eastern Link would enhance Peterhead's position as a hub for energy businesses, particularly from the renewables sector.

Test drilling in England has found a site that could store 200 million tonnes of CO2 undersea from a cluster of Humberside industries.

The prospect of collecting emissions from an industrial hub and storing them deep below the North Sea has edged closer after initial test drilling off the Yorkshire coast was declared a success. National Grid said that its exploration project revealed an undersea site 65K offshore that could hold around 200 million tonnes of CO2 - equivalent to taking 10 million cars off the roads for a decade.

This type of storage site is common across Europe, potentially providing crucial capacity that would enable CCS technology, without which, according to some estimates, the cost of tackling climate change is expected to be around 70% greater. National Grid described the successful drilling as "a major milestone" towards its plan to create a CCS hub in the industrialised Humber region, which accounts for around 10 per cent of total UK emissions.

Carbon capture, fracking and green-tinged Tories. Guardian letter, February 4th

TUC General Secretary Frances O'Grady reported in February 2014:- 'CCS is a great opportunity to reinvigorate our manufacturing sector and bring new research and development design and construction jobs to Yorkshire and North-East Scotland. Our depleted gas and oilfields make the UK one of the best areas in the world to exploit CCS technology.'

In March 2015 Tower Bridge Ventures proposed to dock three floating gas-fired power stations in Scottish ports on specialised barges. SSE/Scottish Hydro also wants the contract for PPS.

News post from Offshore Aberdeen
Ref:
Date:
2012-07-27 00:00:00.0
Location:
Photographer: