Geese at lochan, Forvie Moor

Geese at lochan, Forvie Moor

700,000 geese fly south to the UK every winter. Thousands arrive to overwinter in Aberdeenshire as part of their annual migration from their breeding grounds in Greenland and Iceland.

One of the smaller species of Grey Geese, the pink-footed have stubby darkish bills with variable distal pink banding, a darkish head and neck, and er.. pink feet. They raise one brood of young in Greenland and Iceland. The female alone incubates 4-5 large white eggs during June and early July. After 3 weeks of incubation, the young hatch, grow rapidly and are able to fly after 8 weeks.

The geese can be best viewed at the RSPB reserve at Loch of Strathbeg, near Rattray Head. Almost 65,000 were counted at the reserve in October – the highest number in nine years. Other attractions at Strathbeg include hen harriers, terns and wild ponies.

The Ythan estuary and the Meikle Loch near Collieston are also traditional roosting sites for the geese. In October 79,000+ pink-footed geese - the largest influx yet - have been recorded further south on the East coast at Montrose Basin. It's unseasonably warm in Scotland this winter (2014/15): migrating geese numbers further south - Norfolk for example - are well down.

The geese roost at night on water, safe from predators. Feeding on farmland, they eat grass, grain, potatoes and carrots. In May they return to their breeding grounds

The following pair of images contain poetry by Violet Jacob and a link to a Ken Jack video on YouTube.
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Geese at lochan, Forvie Moor

Geese at lochan, Forvie Moor

700,000 geese fly south to the UK every winter. Thousands arrive to overwinter in Aberdeenshire as part of their annual migration from their breeding grounds in Greenland and Iceland.

One of the smaller species of Grey Geese, the pink-footed have stubby darkish bills with variable distal pink banding, a darkish head and neck, and er.. pink feet. They raise one brood of young in Greenland and Iceland. The female alone incubates 4-5 large white eggs during June and early July. After 3 weeks of incubation, the young hatch, grow rapidly and are able to fly after 8 weeks.

The geese can be best viewed at the RSPB reserve at Loch of Strathbeg, near Rattray Head. Almost 65,000 were counted at the reserve in October – the highest number in nine years. Other attractions at Strathbeg include hen harriers, terns and wild ponies.

The Ythan estuary and the Meikle Loch near Collieston are also traditional roosting sites for the geese. In October 79,000+ pink-footed geese - the largest influx yet - have been recorded further south on the East coast at Montrose Basin. It's unseasonably warm in Scotland this winter (2014/15): migrating geese numbers further south - Norfolk for example - are well down.

The geese roost at night on water, safe from predators. Feeding on farmland, they eat grass, grain, potatoes and carrots. In May they return to their breeding grounds

The following pair of images contain poetry by Violet Jacob and a link to a Ken Jack video on YouTube.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: