Jimmy Reid

Jimmy Reid

'The rat race is for rats and we're not rats.' Jimmy Reid.

The following is a quote from a Kenneth Roy article (on what to celebrate in January besides Burns nicht) in the Scottish Review.

'I would start with a Jimmy Reid supper in referendum year. Apart from anything else, Jimmy would have enjoyed a supper in his honour and it's a pity he couldn't be there personally. A Jimmy Reid supper would, for example, include an address to the cigar.
But I fear there will be no address to the cigar and no Jimmy Reid supper. We are stuck with Robert Burns, year after year without relief, until – to borrow from Tom Nairn – the last proposer of the Immortal Memory is strangled with the last copy of the Sunday Post.'

As well as photographing him, I met Jimmy Reid several times in the 70s. I met Tom Nairn as well - at a political gathering in Kings College, Aberdeen in 2001. At the interval I snuck into the loo for a joint. A knuckle rapped on the partition between cubicles and a rasping voice said: "That's a funny smelling cigarette."

'To unleash the latent potential of our people requires that we give them responsibility. The untapped resources of the North Sea are as nothing compared to the untapped resources of our people. I am convinced that the great mass of our people go through life without even a glimmer of what they could have contributed to their fellow human beings. This is a personal tragedy. It’s a social crime. The flowering of each individual’s personality and talents is the pre-condition for everyone’s development'

- Jimmy Reid, inauguration as Rector of the University of Glasgow, 1972

From Scottish Review, Kenneth Roy writes:- 'Trade unionist and orator Jimmy Reid (1932-2010) was born into the depression of the 1930s in Glasgow, a city with the highest infant mortality rate in the western world. Of his six siblings three died within 18 months. He recalled: 'My mother told me that one of the kids died over Hogmanay. My father had the dying kid in his arms, praying to God, while all around people were singing Auld Lang Syne.' The boy sensed from an early age that there was something profoundly wrong with society; many years later he spoke with intense feeling about his lost sisters. He said that, whatever it said on the death certificate, they had been murdered by social conditions – what he preferred to call the capitalist system.'
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Jimmy Reid

Jimmy Reid

'The rat race is for rats and we're not rats.' Jimmy Reid.

The following is a quote from a Kenneth Roy article (on what to celebrate in January besides Burns nicht) in the Scottish Review.

'I would start with a Jimmy Reid supper in referendum year. Apart from anything else, Jimmy would have enjoyed a supper in his honour and it's a pity he couldn't be there personally. A Jimmy Reid supper would, for example, include an address to the cigar.
But I fear there will be no address to the cigar and no Jimmy Reid supper. We are stuck with Robert Burns, year after year without relief, until – to borrow from Tom Nairn – the last proposer of the Immortal Memory is strangled with the last copy of the Sunday Post.'

As well as photographing him, I met Jimmy Reid several times in the 70s. I met Tom Nairn as well - at a political gathering in Kings College, Aberdeen in 2001. At the interval I snuck into the loo for a joint. A knuckle rapped on the partition between cubicles and a rasping voice said: "That's a funny smelling cigarette."

'To unleash the latent potential of our people requires that we give them responsibility. The untapped resources of the North Sea are as nothing compared to the untapped resources of our people. I am convinced that the great mass of our people go through life without even a glimmer of what they could have contributed to their fellow human beings. This is a personal tragedy. It’s a social crime. The flowering of each individual’s personality and talents is the pre-condition for everyone’s development'

- Jimmy Reid, inauguration as Rector of the University of Glasgow, 1972

From Scottish Review, Kenneth Roy writes:- 'Trade unionist and orator Jimmy Reid (1932-2010) was born into the depression of the 1930s in Glasgow, a city with the highest infant mortality rate in the western world. Of his six siblings three died within 18 months. He recalled: 'My mother told me that one of the kids died over Hogmanay. My father had the dying kid in his arms, praying to God, while all around people were singing Auld Lang Syne.' The boy sensed from an early age that there was something profoundly wrong with society; many years later he spoke with intense feeling about his lost sisters. He said that, whatever it said on the death certificate, they had been murdered by social conditions – what he preferred to call the capitalist system.'
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: